ABREA - Brazilian Association of the Exposed to Asbestos - BRAZIL

              
 
ABREA, ADAO AND IBAS ANSWERS TO IBC - THE BRAZILIAN CHRYSOTILE INSTITUTE
 
 

 
WHO - WORLD HEALTH ORGANIZATION RESTATES THE ASBESTOS' CARCINOGENICITY AND A PUBLIC HEALTH PROBLEMA
 

 

COLLEGIUM RAMAZZINI: Asbestos is still with us: Repeat call for a universal ban
 

 

CALL FOR AMERICAS

 
ABREA: Who We Are
Osasco city (in Greater São Paulo) with 1 million inhabitants is the Brazilian capital of the victims of asbestos. During 50 years two great companies, one of asbestos-cement (ETERNIT) and friction materials(LONAFLEX/FRAS-LE) had in general used this raw material without any information to the workers and the population on its risks. When locking up its activities in the early 90's, had left stop backwards an enormous social debt.

For absence of any social protection and by the companies, these former-workers had constituted in 1995 the Brazilian Association of People Exposed to Asbestos(ABREA), that has as objective goals: to give visibility for the problem, to carry through medical examinations in the exposed ones, to consider actions for indemnification, to inform to the population and the consumers on the risks and its admittedly less harmful substitutes to the health and to fight for the banishment of asbestos in whole Brazilian's territory, as already occurs in 35 countries around the world. Initially the victims began to contact former colleagues and discovered that many were suffering from respiratory problems. Medical examinations revealed an epidemic of asbestos related disease. They linked up with workers at the Thermoid brakes factory, also in São Paulo, to form the ABREA. ABREA has sought compensation for its members while raising the issue at a national and international level, culminating in the international conference in Osasco in September 2000, that created a very strong influence on the politicians and public opinion that afterwards approved the majority of laws to ban asbestos currently in Brazil in a domino effect. ABREA is nowadays organized in several cities and also in Rio de Janeiro State where a former Johns-Manville subsidiary has a textile plant which the women are the majority of the exposed workers.

The truth is that all those exposed to asbestos do not feel that their interests have been represented by labor unions or other social institutions of civil society. Through their organization and their actions the members of this citizens group are expressing themselves against the lack of recognition and in defense of their interests in the public sphere. These alternative movements of asbestos victims have organized themselves into true counter-powers or an anti-asbestos movement coming from below. 

This struggle greatly has increased the visibility of the damage caused by the use of asbestos in Brazilian society at large, disclosed the mechanisms of social invisibility of the asbestos-r elated diseases and has showed how the industry has justified the so-called "controlled use" of asbestos by propagating a series of myths to try and convince the public that asbestos is safe (e.g. chrysotile is not as dangerous as other types of asbestos; Brazilian chrysotile is purer than foreign chrysotile; "Brazilian" companies use asbestos in a responsible manner differently they used in Europe and USA; exposure can be adequately controlled through engineering controls and industrial hygiene measures; substitutes are too expensive and just as dangerous; asbestos products are especially important for poor people in third world countries; asbestos-related diseases are rare in Brazil; an asbestos ban would create unemployment; etc.). 
Thinking locally and acting globally: our challenge.

The anti-asbestos movement (ABREA and the Virtual-Citizen Ban Asbestos Network) use case studies to show how Brazilian workers organized themselves to fight for an asbestos ban and to gain recognition of their predicament as asbestos victims. 

The development of the anti-asbestos campaign in Brazil has been possible for the recent emergence of a wave of new international social movements that "think locally and act globally". These new non-hierarchical campaigns have democratized policy development and promoted broad participation of a new generation of activists by using new information and communications technology to exchange ideas, information and proposals. The new global society - as they have been called - have also managed to mobilize large numbers of people in direct action against the governments, institutions and transnational corporations that are bent on building a socially exclusive neoliberal world order - the "economic fundamentalism".
 

 WHO RESTATES IN MAY, 2010 THAT THE BAN OF ASBESTOS IS THE MOST EFFICIENT WAY TO ELIMINATE ASBESTOS-RELATED DISEASES


Ban on Asbestos Diaphragms in the Chlorine-related Chemical Industry and Efforts toward a Worldwide Ban  por Fernanda Giannasi
 

ROTTERDAM CONVENTION: 3rd TIME LUCKY? by Laurie Kazan-Allen/2006

 


Brazil’s Position on Chrysotile – No Position! by Fernanda Giannasi

 


ETERNIT CONDEMNED IN CLASS ACTION


The situation of abandoned asbestos mines in Brazil Following the trail of mineral activities and their negative social and environmental impacts:  The Jaramataia case in Alagoas

Author: Fernanda Giannasi, 2004


Asbestos in Brazil

Fernanda Giannasi, Paulo Gilvane Lopes Pena


Call for an International Ban on Asbestos

To eliminate the burden of disease and death that is caused worldwide by exposure to asbestos, The Collegium Ramazzini calls for an immediate ban on all mining and use of asbestos. To be effective, the ban must be international in scope and must be enforced in every country in the world.


ASBESTOS MAGNATE TO ENVIRONMENTAL GURU: THE MORPHING OF STEPHAN SCHMIDHEINY

Schmidheiny uses his "philanthropic" interests in Latin America to create the impression that he has invented a new environmental paradigm based on the slogans "Eco-Efficiency" by Daniel Berman


THE EUROPEAN ASBESTOS SEMINAR


Criticism against ICOH and why  Brazil Should 
Not Host the ICOH Congress in 2003


Text by HSE-Health and Safety Executive 
"Brazil - where the nuts(and gaskets) come from: A tale of international co-operation."


Your money or your life


Letter of the Flemming Hansen (Health and Safety Coordinator Construction Workers of Copenhagen, Denmark) for Shareholders of St GobainHealth


General Principles of conduct and action for the Saint-Gobain Group.


28/04/2003 - Brazil: 
Manifestation marks day of the Victims of Accidents and Diseases of the Work 


Fighting for
Asbestos Justice in Brazil

Multinational Monitor - April 2003 - VOLUME 24 - NUMBER 4


Dresden Declaration on the Protection 
of Workers against Asbestos

In 2000 an Asbestos Session initiated by the Senior Labour Inspectors' Committee (SLIC) on the hazards caused by handling of asbestos at work, was held in Sweden, Spain, the UK and France. The report of this Session initiated the Asbestos Conference 2003 in Dresden. Also in 2003 the revised European Union (EU) Asbestos Directive was adopted. In this context, the European Asbestos Conference in Dresden makes the following declaration.


Brazil's asbestos victims gasp for justice
By Gibby Zobel in São Paulo, Brazil
ALJAZEERA - NEWS GLOBAL
Monday 20 October 2003, 9:25 Makka Time, 6:25 GMT   

João Baptista Momi was a loyal factory worker for 32 years.
“I was proud of the company, they paid a good salary," he says of his bosses at Eternit.
But the company was using asbestos in its products. Now aged 71, Joao is debilitated by asbestosis, the disease caused by toxic fibres blocking his lungs.

 


BMJ  2004;328:237-238 (31 January), doi:10.1136/bmj.328.7434.237

Editorial

Radical surgery for mesothelioma

The epidemic is still to peak and we need more research to manage it

 


Brazil’s asbestosis ‘star’ to step into global limelight

 


Global Asbestos Congress 2004 in Tokyo 

November 19-21,2004, Waseda University, Tokyo, Japan 21 November 2004 

Tokyo Declaration 

The Participants of the Global Asbestos Congress 2004 in Tokyo (GAC2004) gathering from 40 countries and regions all over the world from 19-21, November 2004, issue the following appeal to governments, organizations, groups and people in view of the devastating health effects of all forms of asbestos, a proven carcinogen. Highlighting international initiatives for eliminating asbestos risks, participants agree to take urgent action to intensify these initiatives.

 


Occupational Exposures to Asbestos in Brazil

by FERNANDA GIANNASI and ANNIE THÉBAUD-MONY

published at the INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF OCCUPATIONAL AND ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH, 1997; 3:150-157


Asbestos Disease in Brazil and the Building of Counter-Powers: A Study in Health, Work, and Gender

                                                               by L. Scavone, F. Giannasi, & A. Thébaud-Mony


LINKS:

 


 


BAN ASBESTOS NETWORK

International Ban
Asbestos Secretariat

 

BAN ASBESTOS FRANCE

(association de lutte contre l'amiante)

 

Associazione Esposti Amianto

 


asbestos disease awareness organization


BAN ASBESTOS CANADA

 

 


PORTUGAL

 

 

 

 

 

AS.AR.E.A. Asociación Argentina de Expuestos al Amianto

   


PORTUGUESE

E-Mail: abrea@abrea.com.br


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